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You already know Sega's game of tennis is more Pete Sampras than Tim Henman but that doesn't stop me making a racquet...

9.1

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Hard
Learning Curve:
0 to 30 Minutes
Time Spent:
40 to 100 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Immersive"

Summary

Tennis can hardly be called exciting with the amazing personalities of monkey boy Pete Sampras and the useless Tim Henman. However Sega’s ‘ace’ effort is indeed a ‘smash’. I don’t think I’m going to keep up with all this silliness...

Undoubtedly this is the best tennis game ever. Mainly this is due to the simple yet effective controls. You only have to use two buttons; a normal hit and a lob. With this endless moves can be made and this allows the gamer to get into it easily. Ideal for novices and experts alike! With the inevitable constant playing you’ll soon realise that the sensitive analogue stick allows you to place the ball exactly where you want, including necessary backspin. You’ll half gasp and laugh when your professional whacks the ball between his legs. Such is the joy and it becomes addictive as hard drugs. This is without scraping the multiplayer modes and the World Circuit mode. There sure a lot of happy gaming hours stuck in here. Several games of tennis are played on varying surfaces ranging through carpet to lawn, with singles and doubles. Then there are the sub games to conquer, gritting teeth almost constantly, and the shops to buy costumes and new players. You’ll keep playing and you actually feel rewarded for all your hard work. Bien!

Another neat addition is the amount of real players. Favourites include Courier, Moya, Henman (who looks like a zombie!), Haas, Pioline, Johansson, Kafelnikov and Philippousis are all here with a further eight characters. The multiplayer is one of the most enjoyable on any machine, especially in doubles mode. To think we haven’t mentioned the incredible detail of graphics, realistic ball physics and so on. Stop reading and ‘set’ your mind on buying this ‘game’. You’ll absolutely ‘love’ it!




Meh.

6.7

Fair
Difficulty:
Easy
Learning Curve:
0 to 30 Minutes
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Hard to describe"

Summary

This was an okay game i guess. though there was nothing interesting about it, it was a good game nevertheless. the gameplay is just like any other tennis game: repetitive, easy and can be beaten in 2 hours. the graphics are mediocre at best. though it isn't as realistic as you would think. the sound...um, okay...i guess. the control is kind of hard to get used to, and it gets frustrating after awhile. overall this was a medicore game that should be rented first if your a sports fan. but if not, play DOA xtreme beach volleyball for some real fun.




If you haven't owned a tennis game yet, it's about time. I don't even like the sport and I love this game to death.

9.4

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Hard
Learning Curve:
0 to 30 Minutes
Time Spent:
40 to 100 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Highly addictive"

Summary

Tennis has not had a great showing in video game history, Pong was the best back and forth action the industry had seen, up until Virtua Tennis rejuvenated the sport's video game appeal, and has been challenge by few since its release.

Virtua Tennis is a real pick up and play kind of game. The control is just so amazing in every way. The control does this by allowing you to put the ball exactly where, and how you want it at all times; this can be done with the touch of a button and the point of a joy stick, depending on where the ball it at the time and on how fast you're running. Your player will make all the right moves to play the ball based on it's position, keeping your frustration bottled up and only existent when the computer AI opens a can of whoop *** on you. The courts alone in Virtua Tennis provide more game-play depth also, as each court type will affect the bounce of the ball.

The main attraction in Virtua Tennis is the world championship mode, where you must hire and fire partners, compete in singles and doubles matches, buy new outfits, keep your energy up with plenty of health drinks, get the newest most stylish rackets, while keeping them fine tuned by getting the strings tightened, you can play mini games to unlock even more goodies throughout the game, and You can even unlock new players. The world championship mode will challenge you to say the least, but the game is so addictive that it'll seem like it's over in no time, though you won’t feel like it's over until you've unlocked all the players, rackets, and suits.

The game really ups the anti when it comes down to the presentation it holds, using fluid player, crowd, and ball fetcher boy animations and sounds. Over passing clouds will even leave shadows on the court. The only thing that sticks out as odd about the presentation is that the players themselves look downright ugly; it's not because of the graphics, they're just really ugly. The sound also proves to be very worthy; making matches that much more in-depth with authentic player grunts, sneaker squeaks, and ball-to-racket sounds. But don't expect to be won over by any flashy soundtrack or anything, the quality mostly retains to the game-play itself.

Four player doubles matches make for a downright hilarious time, and playing two players vs. the computer players will add more fun as you and a friend drive through the game (Though the computer team mate AI is probably much better than your friends in most cases). Multi-player in tennis games has probably been the most overlooked feature up until Virtua Tennis' release.

A full out blast to play, with innovations such as the mini games, the control, the world mode that seems more like it's based on your choices, rather than just playing one opponent after another, and the possibility for your player to lose energy and for his racket's strings to get loose. I don't even like tennis, and this is still a game that is on my top sports titles list. Just try missing this classic; you'll only be cheating yourself.






If you haven't owned a tennis game yet, it's about time. I don't even like the sport and I love this game to death.

9.2

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Just Right
Learning Curve:
0 to 30 Minutes
Time Spent:
40 to 100 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Highly addictive"

Summary

Tennis has not had a great showing in video game history, Pong was the best back and forth action the industry had seen, up until Virtua Tennis rejuvenated the sport's video game appeal, and has been challenge by few since its release.

Virtua Tennis is a real pick up and play kind of game. The control is just so amazing in every way. The control does this by allowing you to put the ball exactly where, and how you want it at all times; this can be done with the touch of a button and the point of a joy stick, depending on where the ball it at the time and on how fast you're running. Your player will make all the right moves to play the ball based on it's position, keeping your frustration bottled up and only existent when the computer AI opens a can of whoop *** on you. The courts alone in Virtua Tennis provide more game-play depth also, as each court type will affect the bounce of the ball.

The main attraction in Virtua Tennis is the world championship mode, where you must hire and fire partners, compete in singles and doubles matches, buy new outfits, keep your energy up with plenty of health drinks, get the newest most stylish rackets, while keeping them fine tuned by getting the strings tightened, you can play mini games to unlock even more goodies throughout the game, and You can even unlock new players. The world championship mode will challenge you to say the least, but the game is so addictive that it'll seem like it's over in no time, though you won’t feel like it's over until you've unlocked all the players, rackets, and suits.

The game really ups the anti when it comes down to the presentation it holds, using fluid player, crowd, and ball fetcher boy animations and sounds. Over passing clouds will even leave shadows on the court. The only thing that sticks out as odd about the presentation is that the players themselves look downright ugly; it's not because of the graphics, they're just really ugly. The sound also proves to be very worthy; making matches that much more in-depth with authentic player grunts, sneaker squeaks, and ball-to-racket sounds. But don't expect to be won over by any flashy soundtrack or anything, the quality mostly retains to the game-play itself.

Four player doubles matches make for a downright hilarious time, and playing two players vs. the computer players will add more fun as you and a friend drive through the game (Though the computer team mate AI is probably much better than your friends in most cases). Multi-player in tennis games has probably been the most overlooked feature up until Virtua Tennis' release.

A full out blast to play, with innovations such as the mini games, the control, the world mode that seems more like it's based on your choices, rather than just playing one opponent after another, and the possibility for your player to lose energy and for his racket's strings to get loose. I don't even like tennis, and this is still a game that is on my top sports titles list. Just try missing this classic; you'll only be cheating yourself.




Want a good Arcade style Tennis game? Well, here it is.

8.0

Superb
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Surprisingly good"

Summary

When I first booted this game up I had no prior knowledge of Tennis and had never played a Tennis game before so I wasn't sure what to expect.


There are 3 game modes, Arcade, Exhibition and World Circuit.
In the Arcade mode you choose a player from a list of 8 and play against the computer, advancing after each win with each stage becoming slightly more difficult than the last, the arcade mode is rather short, but enjoyable nonetheless.

Exhibition mode is a one off match in which you can choose between a singles game or doubles and play in a court/court type of your choice.

World Circuit is a career mode in which you start off with a player of your choice and work you way up through the ranks and earn money, which can be spent in the shop to buy different outfits, stages and doubles partners. Along the way there are various training challenges, for example, using your serve ball to knock over bowling pins, or hit a darts style target on the court, but while some of these are challenging, they can get a little repetitive.

The gameplay itself is simple, you use the analogue stick to move your player around the court, the B button to lob, A to volley, or a combination of these with the analogue stick to hit the ball in the desired direction. Serving is done by means of hitting the A button once, which will make a vertical bar appear and begin to fill up, and hit the A button again to get the desired power behind the shot.

There are 2 camera angles to play the game from: from behind the player character, and an overhead view, the latter being easier since you get a better idea of which direction the ball is traveling in.

The visuals are fairly decent, in upclose shots the players look well rendered and animations are smooth throughout.

The sound effects are done very well, from the sound of the players feet on the court, to the sound of the racket striking the ball.

Overall this game is pretty decent, though in my opinion there could have been more variety in the world circuit mode, but despite some of it's shortcomings, Virtua Tennis is a solid game, and worth playing even if you're not the biggest fan of Tennis.
8.1

Superb
9.2
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