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Assassin's Creed: Revelations [X360]





Ubisoft has done it again in AC-R. The gameplay is fluid, entertaining, and original while the graphics are mesmerizing.

10

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Hard
Time Spent:
40 to 100 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Masterpiece"

Summary

Advantages:

1) The mesmerising and accurate design of the landscapes in Turkey and Syria and the stunning views from high towers is one of the main reasons for my deep love towards this franchise.

2) Ezio has still proven to be a far more entertaining and powerful character than Altair in AC Revelations. To be honest, this is only an advantage if you love Ezio as much as I do.

3) I got to know Altair's history a lot better in the game, which was missing from AC I.

4) The storyline is powerful and original, with several unexpected twists.

5) The characters' voice-acting still as convincing and entertaining as it always was.

6) The game includes an abundant and diverse set of side-missions and prizes, depending on the version, which do no harm to its fantastic pedigree.

7) The Assassin recruitment part of the game is a lot more realistic in this game and actually goes towards serving a purpose this time. In addition, there are several new and creative ways in which Ezio can recruit citizens to his cause, rather than the old basic save-him/her-from-the-guards one.

8) Sofia is sexy.

9) The introduction of new weapons and tools, such as bombs and the hookblade, increase the game's fluidity and improve the gameplay immensely as it allows for a faster and more lethal Ezio Auditore.

10) The introduction of new and well-designed features such as the Den Defence is a nice touch to refresh the game. Even if it may not be the most entertaining addition, it is still new and is worth a shot.

11) The game is able to bring Ezio's and Altair's journeys as Assassins to end in an extremely emotionally satisfying way. I'm not gonna lie, but I was pretty sad when Ezio died on that bench in Florence. Legendary characters brought to a legendary end.
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Disadvantages:

1) A few small visual glitches are a little annoying at times; however, it is still less frequent than in AC Brotherhood.

2) Den Defence isn't that great of an addition. The game doesn't suffer with it, but it certainly won't suffer without it.
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In conclusion, the game is a, hands-down, masterpiece. The new and creative weapons, missions and landscapes bring in a wider fan base and introduce a new dimension to the AC franchise. I definitely can't wait to see what the creators have in mind for the AC III game in 2012.




If you want the best in free-roaming, play this game!

8.5

Superb
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
20 to 40 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Masterpiece"

Summary

So far, Assassin's Creed has blown away the other free-roamers with a gripping storyline every time. And, now that the multiplayer is in full swing, this series has been enhanced greatly. Revelations is no different, although i feel that the "Desmond Memories" are like portal without portals. The multiplayer defies my expectations in a good sense. The new modes are exciting, and the landscape in multiplayer is very realistic.Ezio's story in single player ends in an epic way, and it's clever how they introduced Altair into the last game. The game physics are still pretty disappointing, as there are still so many silly glitches that may upset your happiness towards the game. You can be more adventurous in Revelations, as your assassin friend Yusuf Tazim will introduce you to the new hook-blade, and bombs. the crafting system for bombs is terrible, as it confuses me every time i use it. The assassin recruitment system has improved greatly though. More realistic fighting helps the game's rating out of ten for me.

Overall, some new physics systems are hard to grip on to, but this installment has an awesome storyline, with many little extras to increase your liking for Revelations.




Assassin's Creed: Revelations proves that truly great concepts and mechanics will always entertain...

9.0

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
20 to 40 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Immersive"

Summary

The Assassin's Creed series' protagonist used to go by the rather longwinded name of Ezio Auditore da Firenze. But the truth is, players have seen him come a long way from his humble beginnings in Florence, and it's the fact that series veterans have played through nearly four decades of his adventures that makes Ezio Auditore one of gaming's greatest characters. And while Assassin's Creed: Revelations sees Ezio and Altair presumably making way for a new ancestor in the inevitable next installment, it ultimately serves as a fitting sendoff for one of gaming's greatest heroes.

After a brief visit to one of the series more iconic locales, the game quickly moves you along to Constantinople, a city that turns out to be one of the series' most well designed environments. From there the game branches into multiple story threads on Ezio's side alone. On one hand, he must track down a set of keys that will reveal an old secret locked away by Altair centuries before. On the other, he quickly finds himself entangled in political strife which, of course, involves the Templar. By dropping Ezio in a new environment, the series also relinquishes its hesitance to introduce new characters, something that held back Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood's narrative to a crippling degree. Ezio's love-interest Sofia, and the calculating Prince Suleimann are among the several great new characters that Revelations introduces.

In the midst of all this are two more very interesting narrative hooks. Most notably is the degree to which Desmond's role has been cut back. Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood saw lengthy platforming segments in which players could control Desmond much like Ezio. Unfortunately, it also saw incessant and insufferably quip-heavy exchanges between Desmond and his Assassin buddies. Neither of these things make a return in Revelations, and the game is all the better for it. After the previous game's ending, our modern-day protagonist is something of a mental wreck, and as such, spends much of his time in Revelations on the sideline. The most major gameplay sequences on Desmond's side of the equation involve first-person platforming and puzzle-solving in which players must navigate environments by creating either one of two shapes. It might sound odd, but these small sequences are actually a refreshing break from the usual formula, and the proceeding never get too tricky. These segments also feature running narration from Desmond that provide this previously two-dimensional character with a lot of interesting background, and motivations.

The final thread of Revelations' narrative yarn are a collection of recorded memories left by Altair. These segments let you control the original Assassin, but aren't especially gameplay heavy. Much like the Desmond sequences, Altair's cameos serve to flesh out the previously flat character and draw parallels between his life and Ezio's.

In the end, Revelations delivers the best story the series has yet seen. Ezio's last mission is a vast improvement over Brotherhood's stagnant plot, and Desmond and Altair are given compelling second-looks. The game's final chapter is one of the most poignant and memorable story moments in recent gaming memory.

While a good deal of the game's fun does lie in this strong narrative and welcome gameplay deviations, Revelations once again executes the Assassin Creed's series core experience masterfully, and much of the game's joy lies in these tried-and-true mechanics.

As per usual, maneuvering through environments and tackling objectives is done through mixing low-profile sneaking and high-profile actions. Getting to know Ezio's vast move-set is key, as you'll need to know when to blend into crowds, or cause havoc by hiring a group of thugs depending on the scenarios the game throws at you. But, of course, bounding across rooftops, climbing up towering structures and performing leaps of faith is the game's centerpiece element, and it's just as sublime a thrill as ever. Assassin's Creed remains one of the only open-world series in which navigating the environment is just as thrilling and engaging as playing through missions.

Combat is also fun in its own way. While Ezio has a fairly broad set of moves, the two that will find the most use are no doubt counters and killstreaks. When an enemy is ready to strike, all you need do is counter their attack to finish them off. From there you'll be able to dispatch any other enemies instantly with a simple button press unless a foe can manage to stop your rampage. If you compare this combat system to those featured in most action-adventure games, it could seem relatively simple and easy. But, the game makes you feel fittingly badass, even more so thanks to the brutal kill animations.

The story missions themselves are quite good. Objectives are generally varied and relatively open-ended, though players who want more of a challenge can pursue more restrictive optional objectives. Aside from some admittedly dull introductory levels, the missions almost always provide interesting objectives. Inciting riots, posing as a musician (playing jingles about previous victims no less) are just a few of the great missions Revelations offers. Occasionally, bigger set-piece moments pop up, and they are almost always thrilling. A chaotic escape from the docks of Constantinople, and the game's five dungeons are all expertly crafted changes of pace.

Disappointingly, there is a shortage of side content in Revelations when compared to its predecessors. This is partly due to the fact that some of the better side content from previous entries has essentially been integrated into the campaign, but there is an undeniable lack of singleplayer content. There are a few simple side missions that the city's various guilds offer up, a number of collectibles scattered about, and one extra dungeon, but that's about it in terms of structured side quests.

The game also sees the return of the Assassin's Guild, and this meta-game is just as fun as ever. As Ezio reclaims new portions of the city, he can recruit new Assassins. He can then send them on missions for loot, cash and experience. Most importantly, however, they can provide aid in combat, which can prove quite handy for more the game's bigger challenges.

The game's two major singleplayer additions are unfortunately the game's weakest links. Finding materials to craft bombs never sees much use as Ezio's arsenal of 16th-century gadgets can help you through pretty much any confrontation as is. The game's Den Defense mode is similarly superfluous. The Templar can try to reclaim parts of Constantinople you have taken over, but holding down the fort is relatively easy; all you need do is set up a multitude of defenses and employ the use of your cannon. And while the game very annoyingly forces you into these defense sequences once your notoriety meter gets too high, they can easily be avoided altogether by bribing heralds, and killing key politicians.

Luckily, the multiplayer portion of the game is rather remarkable. Revelations iterates and expands upon Brotherhood's intense and unique online offering. Mostly this comes in the form of now-standard multiplayer features including an extensive list of unlocks and customization options, abilities, modifiers, and kill/death streaks. These inclusions add a lot of staying power to the multiplayer experience.

It's hard to give a general overview of game's multiplayer just because it's so different from most other games, and is even quite unlike the singleplayer portion of the game. Essentially, the multiplayer revolves around sneaking, blending in, and dispatching players quickly and quietly to earn the most points. There are no all-out brawls, and special items only come in the form of unlocked abilities. You also can't go around killing everyone you see. In most modes, you are only given one target, and killing an NPC or the wrong player will void your objective. While all this may feel limiting at first, the deliberately slowed pace makes matches intense, as you are always looking out for your target while simultaneously looking out for potential assassins.

New maps and modes also elevate the experience beyond most multiplayer offerings. Even though the game does recycle too many maps from Brotherhood, each stage is expertly designed, complete with useful choke points, and concentrated areas where most of the action happens. The new modes are also great, especially the intense, close-quarters Deathmatch mode.

Though the engine the Assassin's Creed game have been running on for years is starting to show its age in some respects, great art direction ensures that it's still a visual marvel. One of the series' greatest strengths is how immersive it's environments are, and Revelations is no exception. The game's audio also contributes to the atmosphere - streets feel alive with thanks to chatty NPCs, sound effects are all pitch-perfect, and there's plenty of glitchy sci-fi ambience courtesy of the Animus. Animations are even more expressive and fluid than ever before, and the game's soundtrack is truly exceptional.

While it's undeniably disappointing that the number of side missions has been cut down in Revelations, it's ultimately not a huge deal since the campaign can easily last 12-15 hours, and I wouldn't be surprised if true completionists could clock in at upwards of 20 hours in the game's singleplayer component. Add to that the fact that the multiplayer is addictive enough to provide some pretty high replayability, and Revelations is a rather complete package.

The Assassin's Creed series is one of my favorite new IPs of this console generation. While it was initially worrying that the game would go down the road of one-year development cycles, this series as still proven to be entirely worthwhile. While Revelations has some weak new additions, its strengthened multiplayer component and excellent narrative make it close runner-up to the series' high point, Assassin's Creed II. Fears of this being a rushed title should be pushed aside, Assassin's Creed: Revelations proves that truly great concepts and mechanics will always entertain.

PROS:
+Excellent story and characters
+Thrilling platforming
+Great combat
+Compelling multiplayer
+Immersive visuals and sound design
+Desmond and Altair sequences provide a welcome change of pace

CONS:
-The games two major singleplayer additions, Den Defense and bomb crafting, both fall flat
-Less singleplayer content than in previous titles




decent game not great tho could have been better

8.0

Superb
Difficulty:
Easy
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Best in series"

Summary

To start off this game is one of my favorites out of the series there are minor problems with the game like the fact you can not coustomize your character verry well the colors you can die your clothes are not great and a few other mminor things but overall a alright game. lacked substance and like in other games this could use more customizable features like creating your own armors or just being able to change the colors separately and making the character from scratch would be nice all in all the game could be better but is definately worth picking up at your local game store or even online its a good way to take a break from call of duty or battelfield if you like that horrid game but you will be over this game after you beet it practicaly no replay value and it is alot of been there done that but she throws you a curve every once in a while




Assassins creed is back with its next Installment, but it fails to improve the series.

7.5

Great
Difficulty:
Easy
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Mixed reactions"

Summary

Before I begin I want to let anyone who may be reading this that this is my opinion. I already know a lot of people are going to disagree with a few of the things Im about to say. Just remember the fan boys will disagree a gamer who is not as big of a fan will probably agree with me.

The Story- The story continues with Etzio, Desmond, and Altair.
The game is set in Constantinople this time around, which has a new atmosphere from the other games in the series. Older Etzio is on a path seeking information about the assassins while training more assassins in Constantinople. Desmond is stuck in the animus which seemed strange to me. Altair's parts, on the other hand, were my favorite. They had an interesting progression, and they were definitely the best part of the game, but there are only 6 missions during this part. The game is short as far as campain and there are only about 2 big assassinations you actually pull off in the game. Assassins creed 1 and 2 both had over 7 assassinations in them. Fortunately their is replay ability if you plan on getting full synch for every mission. There are also faction objectives and templar towers to take over. There are also plenty of side collectibles. The desmond parts are cool first person puzzles and give a nice break from the constant action.

The game play- The game play in assassins creed revelations is probably the best its ever been. There are more ways to eliminate guards and plenty of weapons. The game introduces bombs in this game and there are places in the game were you can actually build your own bombs. This is a cool feature implemented in the game. there is also a parachute mechanic in the game and a new device called a hook blade. All of these are nice, but they are about the only new things to this game. This is very much the same game since assassins creed 2 except assassins creed 2 was better in just about every way.

The Multiplayer-
The multiplayer is suprisingly enjoyable. I did not like the multiplayer in brotherhood, but the multiplayer in this game is alot better. It has new maps, more characters, more abilities and perks, and new game modes. There is alot of fun to be had here. The interface for the online mode can be confusing at first, but once you figure it out its a great set up.

I have rushed through this review very quickly, so i have explained all of the bad things of this game in bulk. I give this game 7.5 simply because its a good game. There is nothing revolutionary and its a game id recommend waiting on it. I paid $30 for it new and dont regret it for that price, but its not worth $60. If you like the other assassins creed game you will like this one, but Assassins creed 2 was much better IMO.



8.0

Superb
8.0
TOP GUN VIDEO Gamers presents Call Of Duty Modern Warfare 3
TOP GUN Video Gamers presentsCall Of Duty Modern Warfare 3